You take your car in for maintenance. You keep your fantasy team in tip-top shape. But what about your body?

TAKE
THE
PLEDGE.

Pledge to make your health a priority, and get helpful updates, health tips and inspirational stories from UCHealth in your inbox.

HEAR FROM OTHER MEN.

General screening guidelines for men.

AGE 18-39
  • Blood Pressure:Starting at 20, then every two years.
  • Cholesterol:Starting at 20 (ask your doctor).
  • Sexually transmitted infection (STIs) test:Before intercourse.
  • Vision exam:Biannually from 18-60 if asymptomatic. Annually from 18-60 if symptomatic.
  • Dental exam:1-2 times a year.
  • Tetanus-diptheria booster vaccine:Every 10 years.
  • Avoid tobacco.
  • Wear sunscreen.
AGE 40-49
  • Blood sugar test:Every three years after 45; start at 40, if overweight.
  • PSA for prostate cancer:Ask your doctor.
AGE 50-64
  • Fecal occult blood test:Every year.
  • Colonoscopy:Every 10 years.
  • Shingles vaccine:At 60.
AGE 65+
  • Pneumococcal vaccine:One time only.
  • Aortic aneurysm screening:Once if history of smoking.

Talk to a doctor about what tests are best for you. More frequent screenings may be recommended based on your personal history. To learn more, click here.

Six muscle building exercises you can do at your desk.

TARGETED BREATHING

Sit upright in your chair with head retracted back. Exhale forcefully, five to ten reps from lower rib cage, middle rib cage, then upper rib cage while pressing your hand against your chest.

ISOMETRIC SHRUG

Sit upright, grab each side of the chair and lift yourself up, pausing at the top for six to ten seconds. Repeat for six reps.

ISOMETRIC BICEPS CURL

With your chair close to the desk and arms hanging down, make a fist and then curl upward, pressing up on the bottom of the desk and hold for six to ten seconds. Repeat for six reps.

SINGLE-ARM LATERAL RAISE

Sitting parallel to a wall, extend your right arm to shoulder height and push against the wall for six reps, holding each for six to ten seconds. Repeat on left side.

HORIZONTAL SHOULDER ABDUCTION

Now turn your chair 45 degrees toward the wall. Extend your far arm straight out to shoulder height and push against the wall for six reps, holding each for six to ten seconds. Turn chair around and repeat on opposite side.

ISOMETRIC NECK SIDE-BEND, ROTATION AND EXTENSION

Place right hand against the right side of head and push against right hand for six reps, holding each for six to ten seconds, then repeat on other side. Next, place both hands on head and try to rotate for six reps and repeat. End by placing both hands behind head and pushing head backward into hands for six reps and repeat.

Source: Men's Fitness

Fifteen-minute stress relief.

Stress. There’s no avoiding it. All we can do is remember to relax. Seriously though—relax. It takes less time than you think. All of these can be achieved in 15 minutes or less.

1. MEDITATE.

Sit up straight, close your eyes and recite positive affirmations, whether out loud or silently, as you take deep breaths and let any distracting thoughts drift away.

2. REACH OUT.

There’s little better than good old-fashioned face time. Talk to your friends, even if it’s about something completely different. Best case, you end up with a new perspective. Worst case, it gives your mind a much-needed break.

3. SLOW DOWN.

Lie on your back, sit with your feet on the floor—whatever position makes you comfortable. Clear your head, pay attention to your breathing and mentally scan your body, focusing on releasing the tension.

4. EASE YOUR ANGER.

Breathe in through your nose for one second, then out for one second. Add one breath for each inhale and exhale. You’ll feel calmer by breath ten.

5. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION.

Focus on slowly tensing and relaxing each muscle group, starting from your toes and moving up.

BICEPS ARE COOL, BUT YOUR HEART IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MUSCLE.

STOP SMOKING.

Tobacco users are at risk for coronary artery disease, among other heart problems.

KNOW YOUR NUMBERS.

Know the difference between good cholesterol and bad cholesterol. Then know where you stand.

STAY STRONG.

Of course exercise is good for your heart, but research shows lifting weights expands blood vessels and lowers resting blood pressure.

BREATHE, BUDDY.

When you’re feeling stressed, take six deep breaths in 30 seconds to lower your blood pressure by up to four points.

NOT ALL FATS ARE BAD.

Eating a diet rich in foods containing healthy fats, including olive oil and avocados, can boost the level of good cholesterol in your system.

TEST YOUR SLEEP SMARTS.

When it comes to performing at your peak, rest is an important part of your game plan. Don’t let sleep apnea, an all too common condition, turn your sweet dreams into a serious problem. Take the quiz below to learn more:

1. SLEEP APNEA IS MOST COMMON AMONG WOMEN.

A. True
B. False

2. A PERSON WITH MODERATE SLEEP APNEA MAY TEMPORARILY STOP BREATHING AS MANY AS 30 TIMES PER HOUR WHILE SLEEPING.

A. True
B. False

3. SNORTING AND GASPING DURING SLEEP ARE SYMPTOMS OF SLEEP APNEA.

A. True
B. False

4. A PERSON WHO SNORES ALWAYS HAS SLEEP APNEA.

A. True
B. False

5. ONE WAY TO HELP YOU GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP IF YOU HAVE SLEEP APNEA IS TO TAKE A SLEEPING PILL.

A. True
B. False

6. SLEEP APNEA CAN LEAD TO CARDIOVASCULAR PROBLEMS AND OBESITY, AND HINDER YOUR OVERALL FOCUS.

A. True
B. False

7. SURGERY IS THE ONLY OPTION FOR TREATING SLEEP APNEA.

A. True
B. False

Make sure to ask your doctor about sleep apnea, so you can rest easy.

Answers: B, A, A, B, B, A, B
Source: UCHealth, National Sleep Foundation

YOU’LL NEVER LOSE WITH A PREVENT DEFENSE.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States, but it is also among the most treatable if detected early.

  • 90 percent of new cases occur in people age 50 or older.
  • People with an immediate relative (parent, sibling or offspring) with colon cancer have two to three times the risk of developing the disease.

Symptoms include a change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation or narrowing of the stool that lasts for more than a few days and may also include:

  • Rectal bleeding.
  • Blood in the stool.
  • Cramping or abdominal pain.
  • Weakness and fatigue.
  • Unintended weight loss.

Many of these symptoms can be caused by conditions other than colorectal cancer, but it’s important to tell your doctor if any of the above last longer than a few days.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in American men—with about one in six receiving a diagnosis during their lifetime. More than 217,000 men in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, while more than two million American men with the diagnosis remain alive today.

There are no early warning symptoms for prostate cancer. That’s why a screening is so important. That said, symptoms are symptoms, and no matter what’s causing them, you should get them checked out by a doctor. They include:

  • A need to urinate frequently, especially at night, sometimes urgently.
  • Difficulty starting or holding back urination.
  • Weak, dribbling or interrupted flow of urine.
  • Painful or burning urination.
  • Difficulty having an erection.
  • A decrease in the amount of fluid ejaculated.
  • Painful ejaculation.
  • Blood in the urine or semen.
  • Pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis or thighs.

MANTENANCE ISN’T A SOLO SPORT.

Just like your car, your body needs maintenance to keep it running well. So, now that you’ve got some knowledge, it’s time to put a plan in place that keeps you running on full cylinders. A primary care doctor is a great place to start.

Your primary care doctor is always in your corner. They know your health history, including any underlying conditions that you may have. They can also help you make informed choices about specialized treatment and tests.

PRIMARY CARE DOCTORS DO THE FOLLOWING:

  • Keep track of your medical history including injuries, illnesses and medication.
  • Give you a safe setting to talk about private concerns.
  • Work together with you to create a personalized plan for your health goals.
  • Talk with you about specialized services.

To learn more or to find a primary care doctor, click here.