New ‘evrē’ women’s health podcast debuts

The pandemic has been especially hard on women. Now, they can enjoy a new women’s health podcast and prioritize some long-overdue self-care.
March 30, 2021
evre women's health podcast host, Gloria Neal
Longtime Denver broadcaster, Gloria Neal, is the host of the new “evrē” women’s health podcast. Photo by Willie Petersen for UCHealth.

Women are supposed to prioritize self-care, but honestly, who has time?

Especially during the pandemic, many women are exhausted from putting the priorities of others ahead of their own. From children to aging parents to bosses and spouses, everyone wants a piece of us.

Tune in to ‘evre,’ the self-care podcast for women

First episodes:

Listen on Spotify, iTunes,Google Play or wherever you get your podcasts.

If you need some TLC, but don’t think you can find the time, think again. We’ve assembled a dream team of talented, knowledgeable medical experts and we’re bringing them directly to you.

Fire up the podcast app on your phone and prepare for a new self-care podcast dedicated to women’s health. It’s called “evrē.”

In a typical year, “evrē” is a health event that brings women of all ages together for a day of fitness, inspiration and community. Since the pandemic has interfered, the health pros are coming directly to you with on-demand wellness and fitness videos along with UCHealth’s brand new podcast, “evrē.”

The “evrē” podcast debuts during a month when we celebrate Women’s History Month. Next up, we celebrate you.

Former TV anchor and radio personality Gloria Neal is hosting the ‘evrē’ podcast

New evre women's health podcast graphic.

Go for a walk. Escape the hubbub of your house or settle into your bathtub or a favorite sun-splashed chair and let evrē host Gloria Neal and her guests take you on a journey of healing and true self-care. You can listen to the “evrē” podcast at your leisure. Multiple episodes will be released throughout the spring and into early summer. Enjoy them, then join the community and share your feedback at www.uchealth.org/evre.

Neal, 56, can’t wait to get real with guests and fans alike. She has been a TV news anchor, radio talk show host, columnist and community supporter for nearly 30 years. She’s also a sister, spouse and daughter, who has had to cope with losing both of her parents.

“I hope to gather women of all stripes together. My blackness, my heritage and my culture are a big part of who I am,” Neal said. “But, I relate to all women,’’ no matter their color.

Neal gives women permission to let out a primal scream for help.

“I want women to get over the idea that we have to do everything ourselves. It’s just too much. If your body is screaming at you, it’s because we are doing too much. I want us to take care of ourselves and put our own oxygen masks on first.

“We have to learn to be selfish and take the time we need even when we don’t think we have the time,” Neal said.

From ‘girl gangs’ to the inside scoop from a gynecologist, the ‘evrē’ podcast has you covered

Dr. Carrie Landin photos who will be on the new evre women's health podcast.
Dr. Carrie Landin speaks about the importance of connections and forming “girl gangs” in her appearance on the evrē, a podcast that focuses on women’s health. Photo courtesy of Dr. Carrie Landin.

The “evrē” podcast will bring women together to learn, commiserate and share truths.

Experts will give women insights on how to build “girl gangs” to support them while minimizing the “I have to do everything mindset.” A top sleep expert will teach strategies for getting to sleep and staying asleep. A gynecologist will give women the scoop on questions they’re afraid to ask, while an expert on hormones will demystify the chemicals in our bodies.

Meanwhile, behavioral health pros will offer tips on handling anxiety and stress management, while tapping strategies like mindfulness and meditation to boost mental toughness and resiliency.

Neal can’t wait to cover everything — and she means everything — in the “evrē” podcast.

“I’m so open to learning, whether it’s about sleep, sleeplessness, anxiety, sex, and nutrition,” Neal said.

She approaches experts like she’s talking to friends and brings out genuine, funny moments.

“This is a podcast for all women. I talk about learning and teaching. It’s a conversation. We don’t have all the answers. You know your body. You’ve got to trust your gut,” she said.

Expect ‘evrē’ podcast host Gloria Neal to share her own health journey

Neal gets a kick out of fans who run into her when she’s running errands and say her warm, empathetic personality is exactly the same as the person they’ve seen on TV or heard on the radio. She sometimes goes by “Glo,” and that’s fitting for a woman who radiates her own glow in the world.

“This is real life. What you see is what you get. That’s the secret in my sauce,” said Neal.

Photo of Neal recording the new evre women's health podcast with a mic.
Gloria Neal hosts the new evrē women’s health podcast. Photo by Willie Petersen for UCHealth.

She also connects with health challenges that many people have faced. Her family has a history of diabetes. Her father was one of 20 children (including two sets of twins). The family lived and farmed land near Charleston, South Carolina. Several of her father’s siblings developed insulin-dependent diabetes.

Neal, herself, came close to being diagnosed with diabetes.

“I was really heavy. I told myself, ‘You know the solution. You’ve got to move. You’ve got to move,’” Neal said. “There is no alternative.”

Neal exudes strength and adaptability. She credits a childhood as an Army “brat.” Her dad served for 31 years in the military. Neal was born at Fort Jackson, South Carolina and spent big chunks of her childhood in Germany.

“It was one of the best gifts my parents could have given me,” she said. “It taught me to throw myself into a new culture. No timidity. I was very uninhibited. That has served me well throughout my life.”

Neal learned German and helped her mom manage money while navigating new cities and new schools.

“There was no such thing as being shy,” Neal said. “All of that was such a blessing. I can walk into any room up north or down south and mingle and hold my own.”

She has called Denver home for about 30 years and has lived in Colorado longer than anywhere else.

The pandemic has been brutal. We all need support from women now.

While resiliency has been a forte for Neal, she also acknowledges how tough the pandemic has been. Many women have coped with mental health challenges, indulged in too much alcohol or too many Cheetos, for that matter.

“COVID-19 is real, honey,” Neal said.

Dr. Katherine Green talks about sleeping better during her appearance on the new evre women's health podcast.
Dr. Katherine Green talks about sleeping better during her appearance on the new evrē women’s health podcast. Photo courtesy of Dr. Katherine Green.

Neal, herself, is embracing the evrē podcast as a way to jumpstart her own commitments to better health and she’ll share her successes and stumbles.

“The universe presented me with this opportunity. There’s a spiritual side of Glo, a funny Glo, a serious Glo,” she said. “You will definitely hear stories about my journey. It’s important for people to be able to identify with me.”

On top of her family’s challenges with diabetes, Neal’s mom was a breast cancer survivor.

“There’s so much of her that is in me,” Neal said. “She had a great sense of humor. And she had a Ph.D. in common sense.”

Neal’s mom recovered from breast cancer and survived 30 more years. She passed away in 2016, while Neal’s dad died in 2013. Neal is the youngest of four siblings and met her husband, Amani Ali, almost 24 years ago when both were journalists. He now works for an engineering firm.

Along with diabetes and cancer, Neal cares deeply about heart disease and health disparities that affect people of color. She works hard to stay fit, take good care of herself, and in pre-pandemic life, loved working out at any gym. And, when it comes to caring for others or cleaning up after them, Neal gets that the pandemic has been exhausting and overwhelming.

“It’s been brutal,” she said.

The isolation and disconnection have only underscored how much women need each other, along with mentors, to help us prioritize ourselves, Neal said.

“It does take a lot. It’s such a tug-of-war,” she said.

And, that’s why the evrē podcast is arriving at the perfect time.

Women need support from one another more than ever.

Gather this spring with new ‘gal pals’ via the ‘evrē’ podcast

In-person bonding made the evrē event emotional and powerful in the past. Once it’s safe for women to gather again, an in-person evrē event likely will return in 2022.

In the meantime, the “evrē” podcast is a new gift that women can enjoy on the run anywhere and anytime.

The “evrē” podcast experts will answer questions that are top of mind to women.

Surveys of evrē participants show they are multitasking more than ever as they juggle all the challenges of the pandemic. They are eager to receive help from empathetic health experts on a range of topics from sleep to anxiety to menopause and mental toughness.

The first episodes of the “evrē” podcast debut on March 31, with new episodes arriving monthly in April, May and June.

Tune in to the “evrē” podcast to “meet” and connect with new gal pals and top doctors who will share intimate advice, support and insights.

The “evrē” podcast is accessible via Spotify, Apple, Google and iHeart platforms, and via www.uchealth.org/evre.

About the author

Katie Kerwin McCrimmon is a proud Colorado native. She attended Colorado College, thanks to a merit scholarship from the Boettcher Foundation, and worked as a park ranger in Rocky Mountain National Park during summer breaks from college. She is also a storyteller. She loves getting to know UCHealth patients and providers and sharing their inspiring stories.

Katie spent years working as a journalist at the Rocky Mountain News and was a finalist with a team of reporters for the Pulitzer Prize for their coverage of a deadly wildfire in Glenwood Springs in 1994. Katie was the first reporter in the U.S. to track down and interview survivors of the tragic blaze, which left 14 firefighters dead.

She covered an array of beats over the years, including the environment, politics, education and criminal justice. She also loved covering stories in Congress and at the U.S. Supreme Court during a stint as the Rocky’s reporter in Washington, D.C.

Katie then worked as a reporter for an online health news site before joining the UCHealth team in 2017.

Katie and her husband Cyrus, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, have three children. The family loves traveling together anywhere from Glacier National Park to Cuba.

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